Two Celebrations (featuring Guest Author, Steve)

Today there were two expectant parents awaiting the arrival of their son.
They both longed to see him. They have three other children and this will be the last. It will complete the family. What a blessing! Their love for him began at conception and for too long they had waited.  He had to mature, it had to be his time, and finally the day had arrived.

dMy father died today.

In the blink of an eye he walked into the gates of heaven into the loving arms of his parents, his siblings, a host of aunts and uncles, and even a granddaughter all waiting to see him. He was literally born again. I’m sure my grandparents couldn’t wait to see him. I expect the anticipation is a lot like the day of his earthly birth.

Was Blind But Now I SeeOur perspective changes based upon our vantage point.
In sports, two people in different parts of an arena can see the same play and come to a different conclusion. To one, with their viewpoint and biases the player clearly scored. To another spectator with their own biases and a different vantage point, the goal was stopped. Both would swear to the correctness of their report.

Only one is correct.

CSo I suspect it is with death.

To those of us left behind, we call it death. It is a terrible separation that rips our loved one from us. We are left with that tremendous empty sensation that has no earthly solution. In contrast, to those in heaven it is a day of rejoicing as their loved one finally “slipped the surly bonds of earth” to “touch the face of God” (January 28, 1986 | President Ronald Reagan). The interpretation of the event is again controlled by ones perspective and vantage point.

Ultimately, the biggest perspective difference is our understanding of what happens to us after death.

It changes everything.

To those who believe that life ends here, death must hold a level of emptiness and pain that I cannot comprehend. For those like me who live in the hope of life eternal, death and its associated separation has less pain. This hope comes with the promise of reunion. Yes, we must endure separation, but ultimately there will be reunion.

SIn 2 Samuel 12:23, King David comments on the death of his son. He says: “But now he has died. Can I bring him back again? I will go to him, but he will not return to me.” King David lived in the promise of life eternal as I do.

Although my father will not return to me, I will go to him and I look forward to our reunion. I suspect for my parents, my earthly death will look like birth from their new vantage point. So when you think about birth and death, unless you precede them in the latter, your parents celebrate both.

Ponder that a bit. It is truly wondrous.

Thoughtfully,
Steve

I Corinthians 15:19 “If in this life only we have hope in Christ, we are of all men most miserable.”


Recommended reading:
I Corinthians 15  The Holy Bible, Paul the Apostle

Be Thou the Rainbow

Moorea

“Be thou the rainbow in the storms of life. The evening beam that smiles the clouds away, and tints tomorrow with prophetic ray.” ~ Lord Byron

I don’t know anything that speaks fresh more than a rainbow after the rain. And I can’t think of a more appropriate photo than this, taken with an iPhone 5. Much thanks to my guest author, Steve, for this photo taken on a recent vacation. When I saw it, I couldn’t believe my eyes. Simply spectacular. But there is something else quite delightful about this photo. If you look across the top third you will see a faint hint of color. There is another rainbow, making it that more rare event of a double rainbow! It’s worth clicking on for a larger view. I’ve asked Steve for a short description:

“We were at our hotel in Moorea and it had been a blustery day with thirty mph winds and a fine, misting rain. Curiously, there were times that it continued to rain even when the sky had minimal clouds or even blue skies. This photo was taken from a bridge as I was walking across the hotel grounds.”

Enjoy.
Peace, Alexandria
{P.S. This photo was taken with an iPhone 5. The only editing done was the “enhance” tool within iPhone, which did little to alter the photo. Nothing else was done. To me, the photo is perfect in every way. I give Steve credit for being fast with the camera and setting up perfect composition.}
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Daily Prompt: Colors

My favorite:
The Colours of Love

You might enjoy some other articles by Steve:
A Tale of Agony
My Thoughts on Aging
Taxes Made Simple
Healthcare: Good, Fast, Cheap. You Only Get Two

Healthcare: Good, Fast, Cheap. You Only Get Two. | Guest Author, Steve

Capitalism brings Americans an abundance of products and our mindset is very clear. When it comes to purchasing we want everything good, fast, and cheap.
Think about it.

  • We want high quality—good.
  • We want it readily available—fast.
  • And we want it affordable—cheap.

But there is something I don’t think we realize. You see, in nearly all of life, you can only have TWO.

Never THREE.

ONE is always sacrificed.If the product is good and always available, it will not be cheap. If the product is fast and cheap, it will not be good.
Think about McDonalds or KFC. The food is fast and cheap but not very good on any culinary scale. Think about out-of-season citrus. It is good and available, but it is not cheap.

The Palm (restaurant)Ever heard of a restaurant called The Palm? There are several in the United States and they have a reputation as one of the finest. The food is exceptional {good}, and its served in a timely manner {fast}, but since it’s prepared fresh to your exact preference from the finest ingredients, it’s expensive {not cheap}. When it comes to any restaurant, my wife and I agree—you get what you pay for.

We may not like it but we’ll automatically accept a price if the goods meet two of the qualifications, never even realizing we didn’t get all three.

And this is a very important aspect that is about to affect our lives deeply.

Morsani Center for Advanced Health Care

It’s regarding healthcare.
And this is the little secret that no one wants to discuss.

  • We want all three.
  • Our politicians are promising all three.
  • But we can’t have all three.

The American healthcare system was built on the premise that healthcare should be the best possible {good} and should be instantly available {fast}. By the above definition, we know it has to be expensive {not cheap}.

To carry out the goal of less expensive healthcare, we must accept a reduction in quality or availability {bad/slow}.
If you want to keep it cheap, quality must decline. A cheaper system rewards doctors less pay. This discourages the best and brightest from choosing medicine as a career. The debt burden is just too costly. At this moment a new graduate doctor will not pay off medical school loans until age forty. From a practical standpoint, who will choose medicine as a career?

Another result is it discourages industry from developing innovations to improve healthcare.
Cuba has a health care system that is an example of cheap and available but the quality is substandard when compared to the United States. There are procedures and surgeries totally unavailable. I recently offered to go to Cuba to teach a procedure that is readily available in the United States. They were interested but don’t have the equipment nor has the procedure ever been done in the island nation. Innovations have been totally absent from this nation for decades.

Canada FlagAn excellent example of the good-but-slow approach is Canada.
Overall, Canadians have good healthcare, but they often wait months for solutions that would occur quickly in the United States. The healthcare products retain quality and the price is cheaper. But the natural byproduct is shortages, creating great frustration. If this were not the case, Canadians near the border would not cross into the United States for surgical solutions to their problems that would otherwise take months to get.

For example, a woman with a rotator-cuff tear needed an MRI. Her appointment was one year away. Then surgery would be another year off. She came to the United States and had everything done in one month. At age 71 she continues her hobby as a long-distance cyclist. Incidentally, her husband died of colon cancer due to the Canadian system not covering colon screenings.

Another concern are further pay cuts to hospitals and physicians.Doctor's Office (Tools of The Trade)
With universal healthcare a government has to cut expenses in several ways. A big way they do this is cutting reimbursement to physicians and hospitals. When government sets a fixed price for a hospital or doctor, expecting the same quality, the only option is less available healthcare.

This already occurs in our system with Medicare and Medicaid. Medicare patients without a primary care physician have problems establishing themselves in a new practice. Medicaid patients are not seen in certain practices or there are limitations on the amount seen.

In the end, this will drive many hospitals and doctor’s offices out of business.
Clearly, with the upcoming deeper pay cuts, some hospitals will have to close and surveys have demonstrated that up to 40% of doctors plan to stop seeing Medicare patients. Like many other physicians, I love the relationships I’ve built over the years with my patients. But the planned fee schedule cuts could make it impossible to deliver the same personalized care that so many of us want to provide.

To stay in business, changes will have to take place and this will impact either quality or availability. What a disappointment to both of us—the providers and the patients.

Controlling healthcare costs is a great idea.
Unfortunately, it will have a natural outcome of either decreasing quality or availability. Price fixing in any market results in reduced availability or quality. Either can be acceptable options as long as people are aware of what’s coming.
But are these acceptable?

To pretend we can have high quality healthcare that is readily available and affordable is disingenuous.

Unfortunately good, fast, and cheap cannot coexist.

At the very least, we deserve honesty from our political leaders.

Thoughtfully,
Steve

Daily Post: Health Care/

Photo credits:
The Palm Restaurant website
Morsani Center for Advanced Health Care website
Canada Flag: Michael Yat Kit Chung
Doctor's office tools of the trade: public domain
Other photos by Alexandria Sage

Healthcare: Good, Fast, Cheap. You Only Get Two. | Guest Author

Capitalism brings Americans an abundance of products and our mindset is very clear. When it comes to purchasing we want everything good, fast, and cheap.
Think about it.

  • We want high quality—good.
  • We want it readily available—fast.
  • And we want it affordable—cheap.

But there is something I don’t think we realize. You see, in nearly all of life, you can only have TWO.

Never THREE.

ONE is always sacrificed.

If the product is good and always available, it will not be cheap. If the product is fast and cheap, it will not be good.

Think about McDonalds or KFC. The food is fast and cheap but not very good on any culinary scale. Think about out-of-season citrus. It is good and available, but it is not cheap.

The Palm (restaurant)Ever heard of a restaurant called The Palm? There are several in the United States and they have a reputation as one of the finest. The food is exceptional {good}, and its served in a timely manner {fast}, but since it’s prepared fresh to your exact preference from the finest ingredients, it’s expensive {not cheap}. When it comes to any restaurant, my wife and I agree—you get what you pay for.

We may not like it but we’ll automatically accept a price if the goods meet two of the qualifications, never even realizing we didn’t get all three.

And this is a very important aspect that is about to affect our lives deeply.

Morsani Center for Advanced Health Care

It’s regarding healthcare.
And this is the little secret that no one wants to discuss.

  • We want all three.
  • Our politicians are promising all three.
  • But we can’t have all three.

The American healthcare system was built on the premise that healthcare should be the best possible {good} and should be instantly available {fast}. By the above definition, we know it has to be expensive {not cheap}.

To carry out the goal of less expensive healthcare, we must accept a reduction in quality or availability {bad/slow}.
If you want to keep it cheap, quality must decline. A cheaper system rewards doctors less pay. This discourages the best and brightest from choosing medicine as a career. The debt burden is just too costly. At this moment a new graduate doctor will not pay off medical school loans until age forty. From a practical standpoint, who will choose medicine as a career?

Another result is it discourages industry from developing innovations to improve healthcare.
Cuba has a health care system that is an example of cheap and available but the quality is substandard when compared to the United States. There are procedures and surgeries totally unavailable. I recently offered to go to Cuba to teach a procedure that is readily available in the United States. They were interested but don’t have the equipment nor has the procedure ever been done in the island nation. Innovations have been totally absent from this nation for decades.

Canada FlagAn excellent example of the good-but-slow approach is Canada.
Overall, Canadians have good healthcare, but they often wait months for solutions that would occur quickly in the United States. The healthcare products retain quality and the price is cheaper. But the natural byproduct is shortages, creating great frustration. If this were not the case, Canadians near the border would not cross into the United States for surgical solutions to their problems that would otherwise take months to get.

For example, a woman with a rotator-cuff tear needed an MRI. Her appointment was one year away. Then surgery would be another year off. She came to the United States and had everything done in one month. At age 71 she continues her hobby as a long-distance cyclist. Incidentally, her husband died of colon cancer due to the Canadian system not covering colon screenings.

Another concern are further pay cuts to hospitals and physicians.Doctor's Office (Tools of The Trade)
With universal healthcare a government has to cut expenses in several ways. A big way they do this is cutting reimbursement to physicians and hospitals. When government sets a fixed price for a hospital or doctor, expecting the same quality, the only option is less available healthcare.

This already occurs in our system with Medicare and Medicaid. Medicare patients without a primary care physician have problems establishing themselves in a new practice. Medicaid patients are not seen in certain practices or there are limitations on the amount seen.

In the end, this will drive many hospitals and doctor’s offices out of business.
Clearly, with the upcoming deeper pay cuts, some hospitals will have to close and surveys have demonstrated that up to 40% of doctors plan to stop seeing Medicare patients. Like many other physicians, I love the relationships I’ve built over the years with my patients. But the planned fee schedule cuts could make it impossible to deliver the same personalized care that so many of us want to provide.

To stay in business, changes will have to take place and this will impact either quality or availability. What a disappointment to both of us—the providers and the patients.

Controlling healthcare costs is a great idea.
Unfortunately, it will have a natural outcome of either decreasing quality or availability. Price fixing in any market results in reduced availability or quality. Either can be acceptable options as long as people are aware of what’s coming.
But are these acceptable?

To pretend we can have high quality healthcare that is readily available and affordable is disingenuous.

Unfortunately good, fast, and cheap cannot coexist.

At the very least, we deserve honesty from our political leaders.

Thoughtfully,
Steve

Photo credits:
The Palm Restaurant website
Morsani Center for Advanced Health Care website
Canada Flag: Michael Yat Kit Chung
Doctor's office tools of the trade: public domain
Other photos by Alexandria Sage

Taxes Made Simple | Part I, from the Guest Author

taxesTaxes. It’s the topic of the day. As the United States nears Election Day it’s the hottest topic on the table. I don’t pretend to be an economic expert but I do own a business, meaning I employ people {families}—meaning I pay business taxes. So I do know a few things. Experience has taught me a lot and I’d like to share some simple principles about a topic that is discussed, explained, over-explained, not explained, but mostly … not understood.

There are two basic types of taxes.
The first is equally given to both rich and poor—these are called regressive taxes. Examples are sales tax, taxes on cell phones, gasoline, etc. The other type of tax is a progressive tax and these taxes affect the wealthy more than the less affluent. Income taxes in America are progressive. Thus, the income tax rates increase as one’s income increases.

A favorite way to raise tax dollars is to tax business instead of people. It allows us to feel like we are taking money away from the rich people who own the business instead of the working class.
Unfortunately, this is merely an illusion. When taxes are raised on any business, the cost is added to the goods or services created by the company. This means if the company creates something used by all people {families}, then all pay the tax equally. If we are honest, we quickly realize that business tax is a regressive tax.

Business taxes have another negative impact.
If businesses have to raise their prices on goods due to higher business taxes, another country with a lower business tax can easily compete and make the same product for lower cost.

Tax Preparation

Higher priced products made in America compared to the same product made in the foreign country with the lower business tax means our products can no longer compete in the international market place.

And here the dominoes begin to tumble. This decreases the number of American products sold abroad. A decrease in American products means a decreased amount of American workers {American families} needed to make the product. A decrease in the number of American workers needed ultimately decreases the number of jobs to make those products within the United States.
And I don’t need to explain what unemployment is.

With this unemployment there is ultimately decreased tax revenue that could be generated here in the United States. The increased revenue could not just return us to a robust economy but could fund our government and all of its programs.

Another unfortunate by-product of high business taxes is that it encourages companies to report profits abroad. In addition, our high corporate tax rate compared to the rest of the world encourages companies to move their corporate headquarters abroad. This again decreases income reported in the United States that could be taxed. Plus, having a headquarters located overseas decreases employment within the United States. Keep in mind the headquarters employs workers {families} from their location.

General Mills/Headquarters #1

I realize that it’s nice to feel like you are “sticking it to the rich guy” who owns a company {families}. Unfortunately these taxes have the exact opposite result.

If you ask me, this is an attack on free-market principles that will lose. And who stands to lose the most? For starters, try the middle-class. Without a strong middle-class we cannot sustain jobs to provide for our families. What will this do to lower-income working families? What happens to the opportunities for our children? Without the revenue for the government what happens to the poor, the elderly, and the handicapped?

So again, who is the real loser?

Elderly Timorese in Suai Loro

How about our entire future?

Thoughtfully,
Steve

“My reading of history convinces me that most bad government results from too much government.” ~ Thomas Jefferson

Related articles

All photos courtesy Zemanta

My Thoughts on Aging, from the Guest Author

The other day I was talking with a 75-year-old woman about the frustrations of aging. The aches and pains, the limited mobility, the failing memory, the sagging skin—how it all created significant frustration.

We joked about the 98-year-old woman who told me the best thing about wrinkles is that they don’t hurt. Then, in a tone more serious, she admitted she just didn’t understand the value of all this “getting old” business. She posed a valid question. The question prompted some thinking,
Might there be a valid reason?

My Dad always told me he wanted as many birthdays as he could have as long as he knew he was having them.
Over the years, he collected more than his share of serious ailments. No one loves his family or wants to be with them more than Dad. So far, he is still hanging in there. But I wonder if he is beginning to question that statement.

Like me, my Dad is a Christian. We believe in the place the Bible calls Heaven, and life will be better there than here. It is a beautiful place filled with reunion, the pain and suffering will go away, and the tears will be wiped away from our eyes. Life will be better!

So there, in the midst of that conversation, it struck me. Maybe this horrific thing called aging has a purpose.
By allowing us to change our sights from the here and now to the eternal, it reminds us that we are visitors here, waiting for our trip home.

And most of all, it reassures us that the best is yet to come.
The few glimpses of Heaven in the Bible show it to be an extraordinary place, a place so wondrous the Apostle Paul could find no earthly words to describe it. For our families it takes away a bit of the sting of death. When they compare their loss to the gain of the loved one passing, only the selfish can wish for the situation to be different.

So what should we do in the meantime?
Remember the answer to the riddle attributed to King Solomon? The riddle inquires—What four words will make a happy man sad and a sad man happy? The answer was inscribed on the inside of a ring—“This too shall pass.” And in either case, isn’t this the truth? Life is indeed fragile and every moment is a gift from God. Because of Heaven, we can have peace in the midst of all circumstances and hope in a future that bears no suffering.

This life does not end here. It is just the beginning.
So for now, love the life you are given, accept the ailments as a badge of honor, and remember—your Heavenly Father has a better life ahead.

Thoughtfully,
Steve

 

Daily Prompt: Young at Heart

“Remember … Make Hay When The Sun Shines” from the Guest Author

His voice echoes in my mind as if it were yesterday. It was a simple statement with more wisdom than my young ears could discern at the time. “Remember … make hay when the sun shines.” I was just a kid having fun on his farm. He was my grandfather—a farmer with only a third-grade education, but a man from whom flowed endless wisdom. All you had to do was listen.

In a superficial sense I knew about hay. You had to cut the grass while it’s sunny so it dries well and won’t be musty when you bale it later. As I grew to be a man, new realities dawned and the simplicity of that statement bore deeper meaning.

First, there is the importance of taking advantage of the opportunities you’ve been given. Before our modern era, a farmer’s hay in the barn was like money in the bank. The stored hay would feed your livestock. The healthy livestock then supplied food for your family. Storing extra food and hay in the barn meant you were prepared for potential problems. You never knew when it was going to be a long, cold winter or a hot, dry summer. Again, this preparation kept the livestock alive and provided for your family.

Today our lives are different. I don’t need hay or a barn, but the principle is unchanged. The opportunities to make money varies at different times in our lives and we should seize on them. Sometimes the economy is booming and we have the good fortune to work and store extra by having a supply of money in savings—“hay in the barn”. When the sun shines and opportunity avails, it’s important to take advantage of it.

The Bible’s Old Testament tells the true story of a man named Joseph. With God’s guidance, he led the Egyptians to save during seven bountiful years so they could survive the predicted seven years of drought. It worked and the people survived. Like my grandfather, God has given us an example of the need to save during the good times. Again we see the principle—saving during sunny days created extra resources.

We should follow these examples. Lean times will always come but with preparation you will be ready. The trend of the current time is to allow our standard of living to rise during good times and rarely put “hay in the barn” for hard times to come. Whether you’re a farmer in Western North Carolina, an Egyptian, or anyone else—you must force yourself to save.

I’m not an alarmist but facts today point to an impending economic storm. In the face of any disaster you will need three things: a faith life to support you in the midst of the storm, money in the bank (hay in your barn) to keep your family alive in the immediate aftermath, and an education to help you rebuild.

I’m encouraging you to be prepared. I hope you’re storing hay in the barn—the storm is on the horizon. Are you ready?

Thoughtfully,
Steve

A Tale of Agony {Or Whatever Happened to Winning?}


I’m not sure when it happened, but some time during the last thirty years our culture forgot how to celebrate success. We forgot how to be proud of achievement and became more concerned about the feelings of the loser than the accomplishment of the victor. It’s happened in almost all areas of life, but is most easily noted on the athletic field, in the classroom, and now has crept into the business and financial world.

I first noted the change on the athletic field when my kids were small, participating in league sports. When I was a kid, there were winners and losers. Trophies were awarded to the champion and perhaps the runner-up. But for my kids, everyone took home a trophy or a medal. Even the kids that came in last got to take home a medal. Somewhere we lost “the thrill of victory and the agony of defeat.” Instead we became a culture that celebrates the “thrill of participation.”

I learned a lot in athletics but a key lesson was this—I learned more from losing than winning. But even beyond, the most important lesson I learned was that I didn’t like losing! This extreme dislike made me work harder to improve, perfect, and finally accomplish.

From that spawned another lesson—I liked success. The entire crux of the matter found its summation in the most crucial lesson of all—between the reward for success and the negative feelings of failure, it didn’t take me long to realize the extra effort was worth it. Failure spurred me into high gear. No one can achieve perfection but failure drove me to deeply look at how to do things different. In this quagmire of self-examination, success begins. If the self-examination of failure is removed, accomplishment declines.

The classroom is another place I noticed this. Academically, we started celebrating mediocrity. The best example of this is the change of the bumper stickers given out to kids in school. First, we had the bumper stickers that said “My Child is an Honor Roll Student at Fiddle Faddle Middle School” but this obviously offended the non-Honor Roll student so soon the signs changed to “My Child showed Good Character at Fiddle Faddle Middle School.” I’m not knocking integrity but anyone can show good character with very little effort.

Kids that work hard today get passed over, snubbed, even dismissed because we have to lift up those that “showed up.” This is ultimately discouraging for those trying to achieve. Why do we not celebrate their success and achievement anymore?  Extra effort that leads to success was the foundation for the greatness of American achievement, but is a time-tested truth for any society that aspires to greatness. We did not succeed by celebrating mediocrity in any arena.

(Please note—I believe celebrating the Honor Roll Student is correct, but the parents should teach humility by placing the bumper sticker on the refrigerator and not on the car. That way the child has their success celebrated and is also taught the importance of caring about other’s feelings.)

Now, about the financially successful, most have worked extremely hard. They worked harder in school than most, some continued their education, and they work more hours than those who don’t succeed. Certainly we can point to other reasons for their success but largely, we make excuses for it. “They are smarter, they had more opportunities, they had a good home life.”  The real truth is we don’t like to admit someone else worked harder that we did.

But perhaps this honesty can cause us to return to the principle of hard work, learn the lessons of failure, empower our abilities, and celebrate the success of others. Let’s not settle for mediocrity. Let’s relish success and achievement. Every time I meet one of the successful I look at them with the joy of knowing with some hard work I have the same opportunity.

So where did we screw up? I think we simply forgot how to celebrate the success of others and the important lesson failure teaches. It is truly okay to have winners and losers. We are not all created equal and have different talents. But there is no denying we are each called to use our talents to the best of our ability. And this usually comes with a healthy combination of desire for success and fear of failure.

Thoughtfully,
Steve

Welcome—”My Thoughts”–The Guest Author’s View

Hello,
My name is Steve
and I am a thinker.

Years ago I had a professor who blocked off one hour a day to just sit and think. He said it was the most productive time of his day. Imagine what most would think of that—no noise, no talking, no devices. Just time … alone … thinking. Our minds are amazing organs but we use such a small fraction of their power. It is the equivalent of having an iPad solely for the purpose of checking email.

On occasion I’m going to share my thoughts with you. Some might think it arrogant to write down their thoughts for others to read and in a way it may be. But I hope you’re taking time to think about what is going on in the world around you. I worry that many never stop to think. A population that doesn’t stop to think is much easier to rule over. No matter what your background, I doubt you’re really interested in being ruled.

I didn’t call this place your thoughts but in no way do I exclude you. You are currently free to have your own. My intentions are not to force you to formulate opinions that agree with me or any one person. Though you may draw some new conclusions about life or become more firm in your own convictions, my greater intent is to help you pause and reflect or have a discussion. If I am successful in doing that, I think we will all be better off.

Thoughtfully,
Steve

There are two ways to be fooled. One is to believe what isn’t true.
The other is to refuse to accept what is true.

~Soren Kierkegaard

The photos in this post capture the theme “Beyond” so well I contributed them to the Weekly Photo Challenge.
Weekly Photo Challenge: Beyond

Body Work

“Just for a moment I want you to imagine that I gave each of you a car today. The bad news is that it will be your only car for your lifetime.  I suspect given that information, I would see you taking great care of that car.  You would wash and wax it, get the oil changed and get routine maintenance.  I suspect you might even drive a little more carefully.

In the same way… take care of your bodies. They will last you your lifetime.  Remember to exercise, eat wisely, and seek appropriate healthcare.”

~ Stephen Deal, excerpt from speech Things We Want You to Remember
www.vimeo.com/stevedeal

The other day I was talking to someone about some health issues. They were hesitant to get some medical testing because of having to meet a copay or health insurance deductible. We talked about health care costs, which seem to be on everyone’s mind these days. However, when you think about if your car needs some costly repairs, often no one balks at having to pay a price for something like that.

Yes, good health is costly. But it’s an investment. And over time, it’s an investment that pays well. Health care maintenance is an investment that may not show anything outwardly, but good internal health will reward you with more energy to fulfill your goals, to think clearly, and to function optimally. Plus, it gives peace of mind.

Unless you are hit with an illness that was not of your own doing, and we all know this happens, investing what’s needed to keep your body functioning optimally should be looked upon over time like the vintage car in the photo above. Someone invested a lot of money and time and this car is a beauty. I’ll bet the engine is just as pristine.

We owe it to ourselves to care for ourselves and invest in good health. That new crown you got may have cost a small fortune but there’s no price tag on healthy teeth to nourish your body with good food. No one can necessarily see it but the nourishment your body receives from the good food you eat knows it.

And yes, an annual check-up with your physician will be costly, especially when you add some lab work to it. But think about this. You do it for your car. Why would you do any less for your body? Over your lifetime you will more than likely own several cars. They are replaceable but your body is not. You only get one. How about scheduling a check-up today?

Peace,
Alexandria


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